Binare Optionen Startguthaben: Binary Broker Review

From being PIP'd at a startup to leveling up into a FANG in four months.

When my manager sat me down in our 1:1 to deliver me the news that I was about to be put on a PIP the next week and to use the weekend to think what my next step should be, my initial reaction was to want to take it and save my job. I knew I've been in a bit of a slump, sleeping very poorly, and not outputting as much as I could have. But to be quite honest, this was a blessing in disguise.
The company I've been working at wasn't doing that well to begin with. We raised a series D in just under two years of existence and my options have quintupled in value since joining, but we've had regulational troubles and the hardware team has been slipping. Our CTO was fired four months after I joined, and our new CTO promised to double our engineering headcount by the end of last year. We've maybe only added 5 people to a team of 30 instead by that point. To that end, I've had multiple manager changes within that time period: a total of five managers and six manager changes all within 12 months. As this was my first job out of college, I thought this was all normal for a startup.
In addition, the pay was very low. For a new grad that didn't know better, like yours truly, that number was a lot for someone who was only ever paid hourly. But after discussing with friends that went onto working at FANGs and other, more established unicorn startups, it was abundantly clear that me and my fellow colleagues were severely underpaid. Like, over 50% lower in base salary alone underpaid for the same line of work and more stress.
The work itself wasn't that great either. It was a system that had to be supported globally with different rules in different countries and with physical hardware that we had little control over. Nobody left the office before dinner was served, and seldom did people start going home after dinner was finished (well, up until recently since people stopped giving fucks). We had almost no senior engineers either, most of the work was done by fresh grads or interns from top CS schools. We maybe had only four veteran IC's, but the rest of the "senior" staff were in management. Everyone else was a new grad or junior engineer. You wouldn't find anyone that had more than two years of experience in the rest of the crowd. It's fun to be around people my age, but the work was sloppy and stressful when shit broke because you're trying to build something with little guidance and your code reviewers are other new grads that are equally as experienced as yourself. Nobody (besides maybe three people) has ever coded in the framework we used, and everyone learned the language and framework right on the job. Our only training was a link to an official guide.
I'm not going to get into the company politics, but it's sufficient to say our Blind was so spicy to the point screenshots of several call-out threads were brought up in meetings and mentioned in all-hands. It was pretty bad.
But going back to me getting served a PIP. My manager gave me an ultimatum: either take the PIP, or take severance and interview for another company. Over that weekend, I thought really hard about all the things I've seen and done in the past year, and quite frankly, I found that I haven't been happy at that place for a while now. It doesn't make sense to try to save a job I wasn't going to be happy at, where I get paid peanuts, and where my contributions are invisible to upper management because the longest I've had the same manager for was two and a half months. I decided to take the severance and leave.
This gave me time to relax, exercise, enjoy hobbies I haven't done in months, and most importantly, spend time with family and friends I haven't been around with because of this job. Oh, I forgot to mention that the company moved headquarters halfway through my tenure and bumped my commute from 20 minutes to over an hour.
I haven't touched leetcode or interview prep materials in ages since joining, so I really only hit the books about two weeks after leaving. My daily routine would be to exercise in the day, eat a protein heavy meal, and study up leetcode into the night at a 24/7 cafe. I would usually do this with a buddy or two who are freelance developers. I also kept a spreadsheet of jobs I was interested in and updated their statuses in where I was at in the process, who the point of contact was, when the interview dates are, etc. I wanted to end up at a FANG company since their offices were much closer to where I lived and the culture there would help me grow more as an engineer. My process was that I started off with companies I didn't quite care about to practice interviewing, and then build up to places I did want to end up working at.
I slowly but steadily practiced coding problems, took my time to understand what the solutions were, and apply those skills onto other problems that came up. In reality, most programming problems you encounter are really just other problems in disguise, and you just need to know the fundamentals of CS to get through them. I'm sure everyone wants to know what my stats are, so here they are: 64 easy, 50 medium, 15 hard.
After a few months of practice and interviewing at companies I wasn't particularly interested in, I started applying for places that actually interested me. In the end, I got two offers and was able to negotiate with a FANG company that has an office 10 minutes away from my house. I not only nearly tripled my TC, but I also got leveled up to an L4. After being stuck in L3 for almost two years with shit pay, I am glad my patience and steady progress paid off.
My lessons learned in this whole experience:
As for my tips for the interview prep:
Most of my system design solutions came from experiences I've had and a lot were creative, open-ended questions. My advice is to be likeable to the interviewer and not BS your thought process. For some reason, system design is something that comes the most natural to me, so I sadly can't give much tips for studying on it besides seeing for yourself how current systems are built.
And in general, you should be likeable to the interviewer. Smile, ask them what they work on, what cool projects they've done at the company, what their work life balance is like, etc. You're interviewing for the company and you're interviewing the company for yourself. Your interviewer is judging on whether you'd be a good person to be around with for 8 hours and help contribute to solving their problems, and you're judging whether the company you're interviewing for will make you enjoy yourself being there.
Everyone's experience is unique and certainly not as relaxed as mine. I thankfully had enough savings to last me almost a whole year without a job, but I realize others might not be fortunate enough to have that luxury. It'll be hard, but worth it to study up in the evenings and then take days off to go to onsites. In the end, what matters most is your sanity and happiness.
Tl;dr: job sucked, I got PIP'd, quit, took time off, studied, interviewed, and accepted a FANG offer that tripled my pay in four months.
submitted by worried_about_pip to cscareerquestions [link] [comments]

From being PIP'd at a startup to leveling up into a FANG in four months.

When my manager sat me down in our 1:1 to deliver me the news that I was about to be put on a PIP the next week and to use the weekend to think what my next step should be, my initial reaction was to want to take it and save my job. I knew I've been in a bit of a slump, sleeping very poorly, and not outputting as much as I could have. But to be quite honest, this was a blessing in disguise.
The company I've been working at wasn't doing that well to begin with. We raised a series D in just under two years of existence and my options have quintupled in value since joining, but we've had regulational troubles and the hardware team has been slipping. Our CTO was fired four months after I joined, and our new CTO promised to double our engineering headcount by the end of last year. We've maybe only added 5 people to a team of 30 instead by that point. To that end, I've had multiple manager changes within that time period: a total of five managers and six manager changes all within 12 months. As this was my first job out of college, I thought this was all normal for a startup.
In addition, the pay was very low. For a new grad that didn't know better, like yours truly, that number was a lot for someone who was only ever paid hourly. But after discussing with friends that went onto working at FANGs and other, more established unicorn startups, it was abundantly clear that me and my fellow colleagues were severely underpaid. Like, over 50% lower in base salary alone underpaid for the same line of work and more stress.
The work itself wasn't that great either. It was a system that had to be supported globally with different rules in different countries and with physical hardware that we had little control over. Nobody left the office before dinner was served, and seldom did people start going home after dinner was finished (well, up until recently since people stopped giving fucks). We had almost no senior engineers either, most of the work was done by fresh grads or interns from top CS schools. We maybe had only four veteran IC's, but the rest of the "senior" staff were in management. Everyone else was a new grad or junior engineer. You wouldn't find anyone that had more than two years of experience in the rest of the crowd. It's fun to be around people my age, but the work was sloppy and stressful when shit broke because you're trying to build something with little guidance and your code reviewers are other new grads that are equally as experienced as yourself. Nobody (besides maybe three people) has ever coded in the framework we used, and everyone learned the language and framework right on the job. Our only training was a link to an official guide.
I'm not going to get into the company politics, but it's sufficient to say our Blind was so spicy to the point screenshots of several call-out threads were brought up in meetings and mentioned in all-hands. It was pretty bad.
But going back to me getting served a PIP. My manager gave me an ultimatum: either take the PIP, or take severance and interview for another company. Over that weekend, I thought really hard about all the things I've seen and done in the past year, and quite frankly, I found that I haven't been happy at that place for a while now. It doesn't make sense to try to save a job I wasn't going to be happy at, where I get paid peanuts, and where my contributions are invisible to upper management because the longest I've had the same manager for was two and a half months. I decided to take the severance and leave.
This gave me time to relax, exercise, enjoy hobbies I haven't done in months, and most importantly, spend time with family and friends I haven't been around with because of this job. Oh, I forgot to mention that the company moved headquarters halfway through my tenure and bumped my commute from 20 minutes to over an hour.
I haven't touched leetcode or interview prep materials in ages since joining, so I really only hit the books about two weeks after leaving. My daily routine would be to exercise in the day, eat a protein heavy meal, and study up leetcode into the night at a 24/7 cafe. I would usually do this with a buddy or two who are freelance developers. I also kept a spreadsheet of jobs I was interested in and updated their statuses in where I was at in the process, who the point of contact was, when the interview dates are, etc. I wanted to end up at a FANG company since their offices were much closer to where I lived and the culture there would help me grow more as an engineer. My process was that I started off with companies I didn't quite care about to practice interviewing, and then build up to places I did want to end up working at.
I slowly but steadily practiced coding problems, took my time to understand what the solutions were, and apply those skills onto other problems that came up. In reality, most programming problems you encounter are really just other problems in disguise, and you just need to know the fundamentals of CS to get through them. I'm sure everyone wants to know what my stats are, so here they are: 64 easy, 50 medium, 15 hard.
After a few months of practice and interviewing at companies I wasn't particularly interested in, I started applying for places that actually interested me. In the end, I got two offers and was able to negotiate with a FANG company that has an office 10 minutes away from my house. I not only nearly tripled my TC, but I also got leveled up to an L4. After being stuck in L3 for almost two years with shit pay, I am glad my patience and steady progress paid off.
My lessons learned in this whole experience:
As for my tips for the interview prep:
Most of my system design solutions came from experiences I've had and a lot were creative, open-ended questions. My advice is to be likeable to the interviewer and not BS your thought process. For some reason, system design is something that comes the most natural to me, so I sadly can't give much tips for studying on it besides seeing for yourself how current systems are built.
And in general, you should be likeable to the interviewer. Smile, ask them what they work on, what cool projects they've done at the company, what their work life balance is like, etc. You're interviewing for the company and you're interviewing the company for yourself. Your interviewer is judging on whether you'd be a good person to be around with for 8 hours and help contribute to solving their problems, and you're judging whether the company you're interviewing for will make you enjoy yourself being there.
Everyone's experience is unique and certainly not as relaxed as mine. I thankfully had enough savings to last me almost a whole year without a job, but I realize others might not be fortunate enough to have that luxury. It'll be hard, but worth it to study up in the evenings and then take days off to go to onsites. In the end, what matters most is your sanity and happiness.
Tl;dr: job sucked, I got PIP'd, quit, took time off, studied, interviewed, and accepted a FANG offer that tripled my pay in four months.
Original
submitted by cscqsim_repostbot to CSCQSimulator [link] [comments]

file not found - easy anti cheat

edit 3: people on paladins forums are saying it's because easy.ac is down (easy anticheat servers). Guess we gotta wait it out, nothing we can really do now.
Yeah no, the guide on troubleshooting didn't work, as seen below. Even when restarting pc after uninstall, and running anticheat as admin. Guess I gotta send in a ticket and see if they'll do anything or bother to compensate for my vip boost burning away. I really hate when betas last multiple years, the ol' DayZ syndrome. Gonna try a full uninstall reinstall now..
EAC (EasyAntiCheat) errors If you're getting EAC errors, something got wrong with the installation. You have to try reinstalling EAC:
Go to the Paladins installation folder, then go into \Binaries\EasyAntiCheat and run the EasyAntiCheat_Setup.exe file. Select Paladins from the list. Choose the Uninstall option. It's highly encouraged to restart your PC at this point. Launch the setup again, choose Paladins from the list and hit Install. Wait for it to finish, you should be able to launch the game now.
edit: full reinstall through steam didn't fix.
Following this, I may try to use their standalone launcher and hope for the best. My buddy doesn't have this issue atm so it's not entirely widespread it seems.
edit2: Downloaded again through steam, finished the 11 gb download. Launcher wanted another 8.5gb. Now the launcher conked the fuck out and is getting stuck at some spots. I bet their download servers are getting slammed. riiiip vip boost
submitted by bonesnaps to Paladins [link] [comments]

So, about Caldari EWar... maybe some changes?

Does anyone truly like the ECM mechanic?
I've chatted with some friends, and we all seem to agree that's a "no". Perhaps Reddit will disagree.
Yes, many of us have successfully gotten away because of ECM drones or a falcon alt/buddy, but I'm sure most of us have also lost a fight/kill for the same reason.
And the biggest thing that is frustrating about it is the RNG factor. When using ECM, the feeling isn't like other forms of ewar. It doesn't feel like a tool in the arsenal that led to victory, and that you can be proud of.
"I sensor dampened the opponent and managed to keep my distance long enough that by the time he could shoot back, it was too late".
"My fleet applied damps to the logi then swapped targets so that the new guy died before reps could land."
"I tracking disrupted the guy and stayed away from his gun's new and reduced specs"
"I slingshotted and webbed the guy so that he couldn't escape my autos any longer"
ECM instead often seems to go one of two ways:
"I was totally fucked but then my hornets/falcon got a jam so I got away"
"Apparently 3 racial jams from a blackbird wasn't enough to stop that Sleipnir from murderzoning my buddy."
Either ECM singlehandedly wins/stops you from losing the fight, or it ends up being a complete non-factor. It doesn't matter what else you do, what tactics you use, either your opponent can't fight back at all, or your ECM accomplished absolutely nothing.
As such, ECM really can't be balanced effectively, no matter how much the numbers are played with, because it will always feel like luck determined whether it was useful or not. The result is binary. It just makes bonused ships have better luck rolling the dice.
So, how do we fix the caldari racial ewar combination of ECM/ECM burst?
Give them something new.
Remove standard ECM. ECM bursts are relatively balanced (and hence barely used outside strategic lockbreaker bombs), so I could see the argument for it staying, but standard, "You can't lock anything now buddy" ECM should disappear.
Instead, I would propose that, in line with other races receiving two forms of ewar (as in their appropriate ships receive bonuses to its use), 1 short-range, 1 long-range, the Caldari should receive two new ewar that they specialize in. Ideally, this ewar should play to their strengths, or be particularly harmful to their racial opponent's (Gallente) ships. And, as is the case with all ewar, it should have the potential to act as a good force-multiplier.
Long-Range - Drone Control Disruption
There are two ways to do this.
Option 1, the simpler way, is to make this tracking disruption for a ship's drones. Reduce their optimal range, tracking speed, and maximum velocity (MWD speed) by a percentage, as their data interface with the launching ship is being disrupted.
Ideally, you would want the optimal range (sentries) and maximum velocity (everything else) penalties to be the method of reducing effective projection at range, and the tracking speed penalty be the method of hurting projection against smaller targets. Exact numbers I haven't worked out for this one, but if you increase base optimal range on current non-sentries, then even when disrupted, they should still be able to hit from their default orbit range... only the tracking speed and movement penalties would hurt them. Likewise, reducing movement speed would not hurt sentries at all, but the loss of optimal would.
Now you have a counter to an opponent dropping mass sentries similar to damps or tracking disruptors versus gunboats or missile boats in the same situation. On the other hand, drone navigation links (which could probably use a tracking speed bonus now to compensate) or Omnidirectionals act as a counter for this ewar.
Option 2, if CCP really wants to make something unique, but which would require lots of balancing, would be to have the module reduce the enemy ship's drone bandwidth by a percentage... thus reducing the drones they can field. In order to balance this though, there would have to be extensive rebalancing of drone bandwidths (because most ewar has at least one module that counters it, so a module to increase drone bandwidth would be called for, but would require careful attention to prevent breaking ships, drone bay sizes (so that ships have the option to downsize drones), drone control mechanics (so that people don't just scoop your newly abandoned drone), and special cases (getting bandwidth reduction on a Guristas ship would be pretty devastating without something to counter it). That being said, this does have the potential of creating a unique and much more interesting mechanic... after large amounts of technical design and balancing work that I can totally see CCP not wanting to invest into.
Now that the long-range ewar, anti-drone capabilities, are taken care of, what short range ewar should the Caldari have? They could really use a strong force multiplier, and short-range ewar is usually fairly powerful (neuts, webs, and scrams are deadly after all.) The Caldari certainly have advanced computer systems (that CPU baby) and knowledge of energy projection (shield and capacitor transfers) so perhaps something that takes advantage of this?
Short-Range: Attack Nanites
Highly aggressive nanites stream towards and coat the opponent's ship, attacking opponent nanites (such as those used to repair armor and hull) and absorbing transferred energy (such as that used to boost the shields or transferred to the ship's capacitor from another ship).
This one, I've worked on specific stats for:
T1: 30% reduced hull and armor repairs and shield boosts (local and remote), and 15% reduced remote capacitor transfers.
T2: 36% reduced hull and armor repairs and shield boosts (local and remote), and 18% reduced remote capacitor transfers.
Range:
T1: 7.5km or Alternatively 5km Optimal + 1 km Falloff
T2: 9km or Alternatively 6km optimal + 1.2km Falloff
Bonused ships: (Mirror Gallente ships with scram range bonus)
Tengu Electronic Subsystem - 10% range per level or Alternatively +5% optimal and +100% falloff per level (7.5km + 7.2km falloff at V)
Kitsune - 15% range per level or Alternatively + 100% falloff per level + 400% falloff role bonus (6km+12km falloff at V)
Rook/Falcon - 20% range per level or Alternatively +40% optimal and +80% falloff per level (18km optimal + 6km falloff at V)
Links: Would receive bonuses from appropriate Information Warfare Links
Other interesting numbers:
Effectiveness with 4 stacking penalized modules active on same target: -68.6% repairs, -34.3% cap transfers (enough to force a logi V guardian pilot to receive 2 remote transfers to remain cap stable, and enough to break most unbonussed cap chains).
I think most people would agree an anti-repair ewar would be a very effective force multiplier... strong, but not insurmountable, especially if limited by range in an era of long-range stand-off doctrines. The limited range bonuses on ships should make it so that any ships closing the gap between such fleets stand out for being called primary -and would force the logi for the opposing fleet to also put themselves in range of the guns to keep the guy alive, not to mention that this module would work both ways in such an engagement.
On the other hand, for those of us who have had to spend possible fights docked in station because the opponent's logi wing rendered their tank unbreakable, now there are options. If I choose to run a short-range, high-speed comp, I can carve a path through the opposing blob
How does this improve the game?
  1. The dice roll of ECM is removed.
  2. There is now an effective counter for drones along the same principle of tracking disruption for guns and missiles. In particular, if CCP is making fighters auto-replace themselves with the carrier changes (rumored), and if any portion of this mechanic is transferred to regular drones, this would be critical since "blow up the drones" will be substantially reduced in effectiveness (and that's always been dumb anyway.)
  3. There is now an effective counter for logi besides sensor dampening (if appropriate) and rolling the ECM dice
  4. This avoids all of the issues related to balancing standard ECM versus ewar resistance as proposed in the capital changes. Caldari ewar can now effectively be subject to reductions and stacking penalties.
  5. This provides more options to actually inflict damage on a larger opponent, even when they have a logi wing, whereas currently, sufficiently large numbers of logi render attacks by an insufficient force completely ineffective.
  6. This provides a reason to bring shorter range ships and to consider short-range doctrines, designed to take advantage of the ability to punch through enemy repairs.
  7. This provides options to kill triage carriers or any other massive self-repping ships besides neuts or overwhelming numbers.
  8. This would interact really damn well with the new micro jump fields.
  9. If Thukker ships are ever added as a separate faction (come on Caldari/Minmatar), you now have a mechanic to give them that would make them unique (increased attack nanite effectiveness + autocannon-murder).
Thoughts?
EDITED 20:25GMT: There's been a lot of discussion about this. (THANKS REDDIT!).
Two common concerns have come up:
1. Should attack nanites be high slot or mid slot - Honestly, there's arguments for both. High slot would make them a bit more common on unbonused ships, but would fill a useful niche for ships that don't have capacitor to spare for their utility high. It would also reduce the ability to combine them with neuts on the same ship, and the mechanics of unleashing an aggressive nanite swarm certainly seem to lend themselves well to a high slot. On the other hand, locking them in medium slots would make the decision to fit them, in my opinion, more meaningful, since ships that are possible closing to short range already have a lot of useful stuff to fit in their mids, so they'd have to make a conscious choice.
2. Reduce attack nanite range, add fall-off to partially compensate, and increase ship bonuses - There could certainly be an argument for these. Honestly I'd been tossing this idea back and forth for awhile before posting it where other people could see it, and hadn't though about CCP's quest for falloff everywhere. I've added potential alternate stats above.
I posted this on the official forums per suggestions. Yes it's a throwaway, I don't really want to link my eve and reddit to the world yet.
https://forums.eveonline.com/default.aspx?g=posts&m=6208274#post6208274
Edit: 20:42GMT - I messed up Kitsune bonus from original thoughts when I added alternates. I reverted it.
submitted by squirrelbomb to Eve [link] [comments]

Just some introspection about my gender identity

//Edit// I noticed afterwards I should've put gender in parenthesis as this post didn't turn out to be solely about gender identity but things related to it or the kind of thoughts I got when thinking about my gender identity... But since you can't change headlines, please be understainding ;) //
As you see from my tag I'm still questioning. I've written here a few times before, and I feel like this subreddit is helping me to recognize whether or not my issues arise from gender dysphoria of some sort...
Now I'd just like to share a few notes I've made about my gender identity. I don't necessary have any questions right now. But if my notes give you any kind of thoughts, feel free to comment!
Thanks for reading & have a great week!
//Edit 9th Jan// Some more stuff... These things just keep on coming, sorry x3 I think it's better I list it all in the same post so I don't spam anyone else here too much.
//Edit 17th Jan//
//Edit 21st Jan//
//Edit 1st Feb//
//Edit 5th Feb//
//Edit 11th Feb//
//Edit 19th Feb//
//Edit 20th Feb//
//Edit 22nd Feb//
//Edit 4th Ma/
//Edit 9th Ma/
//Edit 25th Ma/
//Edit 12th April//
//Edit 18th April//
//Edit 2nd May//
//Edit 31st May//
//Edit 25th June//
And last but not least, some "can relate" memes for me to return to ;) When you're ftm and see how flawlessly mtfs are when "being a woman" was a chore to you: When my mother may have figured out I am not as cis as I try to appear but has yet to say anything directly. Me irl When someone points out that trans people are crossdressers before they start dressing as their identified gender. Come to think of it... Meme of the day #currentfeels "How to cis" (AFAB version) When you're out online, but not irl, and so you spend all your time online, instead of just improving your irl situation:
submitted by boyinsidegirl to asktransgender [link] [comments]

PSA: How to Avoid Arguing in Bad Faith

So this forum is a magnet for people who like to have opinions and arguments, but all-too-rarely do I read posts from people interested in real, actual debate. In other words, we attract a lot of trolls.
In my mind, debate is centered in finding truth, and where that is not possible, conversation should be invested in finding common ground. Too often, this sub is just one more place where I find myself playing Omnivore Bingo before moving on to the next thread in hopes of finding some real conversation (one that hasn't already been rehashed a thousand times by Vegan Sidekick or vegancirclejerk). The vegans here do their best to hold down the fort, but sometimes we get wrapped up in a conversation with someone who is just here to poke the bear.
Before you find yourself getting pulled into an argument you don't want to have, look out for when someone on the thread has begun to engage in one of the following bad faith argument strategies.
Shamelessly lifted from this thread from 4 years ago in a different community

The list of things to avoid:

Number 1: Asserting with certainty things that are open to question.
Number 2: Responding to objections to these assertions with mere repetitions and/or restatements without giving consideration to the objections (and no, "I have considered them and find them without merit" is not arguing in good faith).
Number 3: Outright dismissal of provided evidence. Demands for more evidence that fits whatever magical conditions they have in mind that's 'good enough' for their hyperskepticism.
Number 4: A refusal to explicitly state what you would deem acceptable evidence.
Number 5: Demanding that others spend time educating you when a half hour on Wikipedia will do the job just as well.
[Ed Note: If you're going to tell someone to go away and do some reading before coming back, it's probably best if you actually tell them what to read. Unless they're trolling, linking them to a source would be considerate. This also helps to decrease the likelihood that they'll spend the next half hour reading a straw man of the concept you want them to understand. (And remember the burden of proof!)]
Number 6: Any variation on "You're wrong because I'm right!" or "My way or the highway." Note that "You're wrong because of x, y, and z" is not prohibited. You can call someone wrong, but you have to back yourself up with why they're wrong.
Number 6a: Refusing to even entertain the possibility that other people's take on a situation may be valid and that there is not necessarily ONLY ONE valid way to tackle a problem/view an issue.
Number 7: When multiple people are saying that there is something seriously wrong with your point (or even just how you're presenting your point), you don't assume that EVERYONE ELSE is wrong or not understanding your Super Intelligent And Reasonable Point. In these cases it is most likely that: 1) You are lacking critical evidence/using bad evidence to form your "reasonable" argument, or 2) Failing to understand a critical perspective (or perspectives) that either contradict your evidence or show that there are more valid options than just your argument. In other words: You need to be able to demonstrate that you are willing to consider yourself wrong and entertain the possibility that, even IF you're right, others CAN ALSO be right. Not everything is a binary 1 or 0/yes or no/right or wrong type situation.
Just as a personal aside, something I have learned through the various fights I've had on the internet: It is often better to be fair than to be "right". What this means is that, even if you think the person you're arguing with is WRONGITY-WRONG-WRONG, it is often less productive to double down on your point (because I'm RIGHT and they're WRONG!) and instead to do things like ask questions and try to understand why they're taking the position they do. Not only does this allow you to better tailor your arguments to them (instead of just doing the equivalent of shouting I'M RIGHT YOU'RE WRONG I'M RIGHT YOU'RE WRONG WRONG WRONG), but it also leaves open the possibility to find out that there were things that they were "right" about.
Obviously "fair" doesn't mean "must listen to anyone who spouts any kind of bullshit no matter what". When it's an argument you've heard over and over and over and over and over again, the next person who makes it is 99% of the time already coming from a perspective you understand. Like, when gamers use gendered slurs in games (or on gaming blogs) I don't need to ask them why they think that it's ok to do that (although, depending on the person/situation, it can be useful), because I've heard every argument under the sun. So if/when I decide to engage, it's not a "right or fair" deal, but rather a "do I want to make a point for the lurkers or try and get this person to understand where I'm coming from?" decision.
Number 8: Do not assume that your argument is "objective". Recognize that you are a human being who brings your own biases into a conversation and even when your argument is supported by facts that does not mean that it is objective. Facts can be objective; the conclusions that we draw for them can't be.
Number 8a: "Objective" is not another way of saying "correct" and "subjective" is not another way of saying "incorrect". It is probably most helpful to look at "objective" as observations that are value neutral ("water is wet") and "subjective" as the conclusions we draw from our observations ("water should be a basic right because people will die without it").
Number 9: Don't use claims of "logic" or "reason" to shield yourself from criticism. Just because YOU think that your argument is "logical" or "reasonable" (or, conversely that another person or persons' argument is "illogical" or "unreasonable") does not mean that your assessment of the situation is correct.
Number 10: Coming to a thread with the attitude (stated or implied) that you will be attacked by the mean forum goers is toxic to productive discussion. It is also a pretty common trolling tactic, where the troll "predicts" that they will get shit for daring to disagree with the community, proceeds to engage in several bad faith tactics, and then jumps in with "SEE, JUST LIKE I PREDICTED!" when they are called out by the community and/or banned. They use this to justify their original position on the community, and will sometimes point to the thread as "evidence" while commiserating with their buddies about how horribly they were treated.
Number 11: Communication involves two people. This means that what you intend to say is not always what you end up actually saying to the person or people listening to you. When you're told that you're coming across in a certain way, DO NOT assume that the listener(s) are the ones having the communication fail (this is especially true if multiple people are saying that they heard "x" when you thought you said "y"). In this case it is best for you to try and figure out where the disconnect happened (rereading arguments and asking for clarification--understanding that no one is obligated to give it to you-- are good ways of doing this) and then figure out how you can communicate in a mutually understandable way.
Number 12: Do not hide behind vague, all-encompassing ideologies.
[Ed note: Do not defend or condemn ideologies if you are not certain what those ideologies are.]
I have seen two cases of this, one from a self-identified conservative and another from someone who claimed not to be a conservative but was still defending it. In the former case, there wasn't even a discussion, just bloviating about how there's so many liberals here and will the poor conservative be accepted. In the latter case, the defender of conservatism was forced to create a fairy-tale construction of history just to defend the basic conservative ideology, and paid absolutely no mind to how conservative politicians have always been against any form of social justice where specific issues are concerned; they've just "moderated" their language as their privileges have been eroded.
Number 13: You are more likely to have positive interactions with people if you learn the standards and conventions of the community before posting, especially if it's on a thread where hostilities have already occurred. Lurking is a great way to do this, but learning the "flavor" of the community is not enough. When watching people communicate with each other, try to see what kinds of words/phrases get positive responses versus which ones get negative responses.
The basic idea is: Think of the forums as a dinner party. When you go to a dinner party it's with the expectation that you will be respectful to your host(s) and their guests. Coming to the party with a bad attitude, being rude to the guests, insulting the host, or shitting all over the house (even if you're being perfectly polite to everyone!) are all things that will get you thrown out of a party. If you wouldn't do them there, don't do them here.
submitted by Carmack to DebateAVegan [link] [comments]

Why are you requesting a refund? Add comments here!

Here was my answer to the refund question:
*Removal of the passive slot and overtake of passive's in active ability slots - you wanted to make the game simpler, but that hurt it in many ways. Less in game activity and abilities made it much more of a stat check situation than a skill based matchup. I believe the intent was to just lower the skill floor - but that was where the thought process stopped: "how do we make this easier for the average player?". The goal should have been to lower the skill floor AND maintain the skill gap. So you can reward better play but someone can still have moderate success when starting out. The whole design process felt like it only ever had 1 level/question to it, when it should have had 3 or 4: What should this hero's skill floor feel like? How do we allow the better gideon's to separate themselves from the average player? How do we make it easier to play for beginners without making the kit unhealthy? It seemed like things weren't properly evaluated.
*The things we were being told didn't line up with your actions - "We're removing passive's because they don't feel impactful and we can't create enough ability's". That sounds horrible. Your design team can't create 4 proper abilities? When you have so many other games to give you potential ideas you can innovate on? And then you go on to put a passive on half the roster anyways. Passive's didn't have to be super defining things. Something as simple as greystones passive - more armor, more health, or even his newer basic deflect give him a niche area against basic attack heavy teams. You actually created plenty of passives (that should have been in the passive slot) that would have been enough to give everyone a unique feel. As minor as this may seem, it was at the forefront of hero design issues from then on out. Any hero you gave a bonus passive on an ability after that (crunch, countess, etc) had inherently more power and it crowded out a lot of the roster.
***The change from basic/energy damage to basic ability damage /=. This was probably the best thing about paragon from a team comp design perspective. With the original design you could have allowed yourself to create physical damage mages to pair with things like feng moa and still have energy damage carries to fill the other damage component need. Removing this crippled your ability to really flesh out team compositions (and future hero designs) in an interesting way. The issue with the current system is now everyone just knows - build basic armor u have too the carry is always basic damage. That's one of the reasons why junglers who have a lot of ability damage are super strong and anyone else who is basic attack damage based struggles. If you kept it the original way, team's could work around their teammates choices a lot better.
*Legacy map removal, including travel mode, harvesters, orb dunking, and inhib respawn - deathball was unhealthy sure, but the core concept of shared gold and exp during that portion of legacy felt way better than being a handicapped support hero all game long. It also allowed me and my buddy to double jungle effectively - a strategy that wasn't really viable in any other moba I've ever played. All those different things along with the immersive map really gave the game it's unique properties (let's not forget it's vertical nature as well). Harvesters added a wrinkle to sidelines and jungling - it was another win condition, and it could have become a catch up tool (something that I thought lacked in this game). Orb prime dunking was just awesome. It created so many fun chases through the jungle and fights, not to mention the ability to use it as a distraction. Travel mode was great, it wasn't particularly hard to play around. People just didn't give it time. And the map... man it looked so awesome. I know it wasn't perfect, but you could have easily taken monolith's speed improvement's, added some mobility items, and hollowed out the jungle and it would have been so much better than monolith. So overall.... you gutted the games in-match variables, dumbed the team comps down, and ultimately destroyed a portion of your legacy player base by trying to appease the people who would never help build the product except maybe spend a few dollars here and there. Short sighted values.
*Dropping "every three weeks" really slowed the feeling of momentum - this was probably due to the card system development and the map being reworked 3? times. All that time could have been spent hashing out legacy and working on hero's leading into....
*There were a lot of unnecessary things done - "reclassifying" all the hero's. Nobody cared about the wild and reckless stuff.... what the hell was that for? It accomplished nothing. And the change to melting hero's down into 3 basic roles? That was just horrible. Moba's have multiple role's because it makes more sense. You can't make a football then call it a baseball and start pitching it. It doesn't work like that. Let's see... the card system overhaul. I get it. People were tired of the same item builds... I don't know why you couldn't just take the new card designs and implement them into the old system or just give the general player's their request of an item shop. The gem's were nice but that stuff could have been done in the form of talent tree's instead of altering the entire foundation of income. Another large scale project that didn't really accomplish what the goal should have been. And, once again, it cut down options overall (less cards, and less in game cards) making the game worse.
*Basically all of monolith's system changes were pretty bad. Removal of cdr, the shortening of ability's to that extreme, cutting down the stats didn't feel any better really (unnecessary use of resources again, smaller number's harder to balance). The map itself was a big step backwards, it was completely unbalanced from a design perspective one side was always favored and it stayed that way the entire time. The 2 v 1 lane alteration was just stupid. It was always an option before there was no need to design a forced alteration like that.... what was the point? To make paragon different? You had that already, and you removed it all. It felt like a shallow gimmick and created unhealthy mismatches in games that weren't even really earned.
*Kallari rework - reasons for her change were hypocritical when considering the new direction in monolith (hey look stealth is readily available and everyone hits like a truck with non ult abilities now!), the removal of her original ult was pure laziness because the design team couldn't fix map collision issues (or didn't design the maps properly in the first place) and her new ult was even more of a balancing nightmare. Her new design didn't help any of her weaknesses, so the additional utility was never as valuable as it should have been considering her wave clear was bottom of the barrel.
*Which leads to another issue - hero kit design. Very binary. You either hit skills or you don't, not a lot of mechanical variance to differentiate the high end players and the low end players, so it was even harder for the balance team to attempt to fix things.
*Steve Superville firing - Apparently this guy had all the brains?
*Playing at elo cap was very unenjoyable. The player's who were "pro's" or tournament players were usually terrible to anyone not in their skill tier. Many of them would hop on alt accounts and treat everyone like shit because even if they got banned it didn't matter to them - you wonder why you had player retention problems - it was people like them. They'll act nice on forums and reddit but the moment you do anything slightly wrong in game they show their true colors. Basically everyone who was on any of the top tournament teams was like this except a handful of people. Horrible image for the game and community that those people were representing paragon. I never took it personally the few times I was the target, but it's hilarious to see some of those same people asking for help to save this game from all the players they treated like $%%% and talked down on, knowing full well they shouldn't have been matched together in the first place.
*The complete disregard for information produced by the people playing the game. You know those who actually had an understanding of the deeper values of moba's and game design in general, the ones who spent thousands of hours in stale meta's - sometimes even the general public were raging about some of the issues and it was ignored. Yall were shorthanded, and decided to disregard the largest resource at your disposal? Out of what? Pride? Your lack of humility destroyed a very promising game.
*Unfortunately, you have to compete with Riot and blizzard in the moba scene and they are pretty good about respecting,including, and communicating with the community. Clearly you guys didn't have enough people to work on the game in general, but the response time on chronic issues was poor and mishandled overall. In that same vein, those companies are very upfront about what they are changing (pbe notes available long before anything is implemented) and give solid evidence as to why it's being changed. They typically openly discuss their future intentions with the community long before anything hits the PBE's as well. Here, there was a constant disconnect between the player base and the designers. If you walk into a restaurant, then have to wait 20 minutes to get a table, then get ignored for the next 40 minutes with no service, you're not going to stick around, and you're probably never going back to that restaurant. That's what it felt like with this game basically the entire time.
submitted by PoeticJumpshot to paragon [link] [comments]

How to Avoid Arguing in Bad Faith

This has been shamelessly lifted from this thread in the official forums, so I can claim absolutely none of the praise that's due for what follows. This should not be seen as a prescriptive rulebook, but rather as a descriptive list of suggestions for maintaining an atmosphere of good faith argumentation. (Note: bad faith argumentation is an invitation to moderator action, so think of this as more of a strong suggestion.)
My thanks go out to the people who've added their suggestions so far (emptyell, The_Laughing_Coyote, ischemgeek, tekanji) for their efforts.
Thus begins the list of things to avoid:
Number 1: Asserting with certainty things that are open to question.
Number 2: Responding to objections to these assertions with mere repetitions and/or restatements without giving consideration to the objections (and no, "I have considered them and find them without merit" is not arguing in good faith).
Number 3: Outright dismissal of provided evidence. Demands for more evidence that fits whatever magical conditions they have in mind that's 'good enough' for their hyperskepticism.
Number 4: A refusal to explicitly state what you would deem acceptable evidence.
Number 5: Demanding that others spend time educating you when a half hour on Wikipedia will do the job just as well.
[Ed Note: If you're going to tell someone to go away and do some reading before coming back, it's probably best if you actually tell them what to read. Unless they're trolling, linking them to a source would be considerate. This also helps to decrease the likelihood that they'll spend the next half hour reading a straw man of the concept you want them to understand. (And remember the burden of proof!)]
Number 6: Any variation on "You're wrong because I'm right!" or "My way or the highway." Note that "You're wrong because of x, y, and z" is not prohibited. You can call someone wrong, but you have to back yourself up with why they're wrong.
Number 6a: Refusing to even entertain the possibility that other people's take on a situation may be valid and that there is not necessarily ONLY ONE valid way to tackle a problem/view an issue.
Number 7: When multiple people are saying that there is something seriously wrong with your point (or even just how you're presenting your point), you don't assume that EVERYONE ELSE is wrong or not understanding your Super Intelligent And Reasonable Point. In these cases it is most likely that: 1) You are lacking critical evidence/using bad evidence to form your "reasonable" argument, or 2) Failing to understand a critical perspective (or perspectives) that either contradict your evidence or show that there are more valid options than just your argument. In other words: You need to be able to demonstrate that you are willing to consider yourself wrong and entertain the possibility that, even IF you're right, others CAN ALSO be right. Not everything is a binary 1 or 0/yes or no/right or wrong type situation.
Just as a personal aside, something I have learned through the various fights I've had on the internet: It is often better to be fair than to be "right". What this means is that, even if you think the person you're arguing with is WRONGITY-WRONG-WRONG, it is often less productive to double down on your point (because I'm RIGHT and they're WRONG!) and instead to do things like ask questions and try to understand why they're taking the position they do. Not only does this allow you to better tailor your arguments to them (instead of just doing the equivalent of shouting I'M RIGHT YOU'RE WRONG I'M RIGHT YOU'RE WRONG WRONG WRONG), but it also leaves open the possibility to find out that there were things that they were "right" about.
Obviously "fair" doesn't mean "must listen to anyone who spouts any kind of bullshit no matter what". When it's an argument you've heard over and over and over and over and over again, the next person who makes it is 99% of the time already coming from a perspective you understand. Like, when gamers use gendered slurs in games (or on gaming blogs) I don't need to ask them why they think that it's ok to do that (although, depending on the person/situation, it can be useful), because I've heard every argument under the sun. So if/when I decide to engage, it's not a "right or fair" deal, but rather a "do I want to make a point for the lurkers or try and get this person to understand where I'm coming from?" decision.
Number 8: Do not assume that your argument is "objective". Recognize that you are a human being who brings your own biases into a conversation and even when your argument is supported by facts that does not mean that it is objective. Facts can be objective; the conclusions that we draw for them can't be.
Number 8a: "Objective" is not another way of saying "correct" and "subjective" is not another way of saying "incorrect". It is probably most helpful to look at "objective" as observations that are value neutral ("water is wet") and "subjective" as the conclusions we draw from our observations ("water should be a basic right because people will die without it").
Number 9: Don't use claims of "logic" or "reason" to shield yourself from criticism. Just because YOU think that your argument is "logical" or "reasonable" (or, conversely that another person or persons' argument is "illogical" or "unreasonable") does not mean that your assessment of the situation is correct.
Number 10: Coming to a thread with the attitude (stated or implied) that you will be attacked by the mean forum goers is toxic to productive discussion. It is also a pretty common trolling tactic, where the troll "predicts" that they will get shit for daring to disagree with the community, proceeds to engage in several bad faith tactics, and then jumps in with "SEE, JUST LIKE I PREDICTED!" when they are called out by the community and/or banned. They use this to justify their original position on the community, and will sometimes point to the thread as "evidence" while commiserating with their buddies about how horribly they were treated.
Number 11: Communication involves two people. This means that what you intend to say is not always what you end up actually saying to the person or people listening to you. When you're told that you're coming across in a certain way, DO NOT assume that the listener(s) are the ones having the communication fail (this is especially true if multiple people are saying that they heard "x" when you thought you said "y"). In this case it is best for you to try and figure out where the disconnect happened (rereading arguments and asking for clarification--understanding that no one is obligated to give it to you-- are good ways of doing this) and then figure out how you can communicate in a mutually understandable way.
Number 12: Do not hide behind vague, all-encompassing ideologies. [Ed note: Do not defend or condemn ideologies if you are not certain what those ideologies are.]
I have seen two cases of this, one from a self-identified conservative and another from someone who claimed not to be a conservative but was still defending it. In the former case, there wasn't even a discussion, just bloviating about how there's so many liberals here and will the poor conservative be accepted. In the latter case, the defender of conservatism was forced to create a fairy-tale construction of history just to defend the basic conservative ideology, and paid absolutely no mind to how conservative politicians have always been against any form of social justice where specific issues are concerned; they've just "moderated" their language as their privileges have been eroded.
Number 13: You are more likely to have positive interactions with people if you learn the standards and conventions of the community before posting, especially if it's on a thread where hostilities have already occurred. Lurking is a great way to do this, but learning the "flavor" of the community is not enough. When watching people communicate with each other, try to see what kinds of words/phrases get positive responses versus which ones get negative responses.
The basic idea is: Think of the forums as a dinner party. When you go to a dinner party it's with the expectation that you will be respectful to your host(s) and their guests. Coming to the party with a bad attitude, being rude to the guests, insulting the host, or shitting all over the house (even if you're being perfectly polite to everyone!) are all things that will get you thrown out of a party. If you wouldn't do them there, don't do them here.
submitted by koronicus to atheismplus [link] [comments]

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submitted by psncodes4free to XPLOITS [link] [comments]

[Table] gaming: I am a programmer for Guild Wars 2, AMAA.

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-10-17
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
What programming methodologies does your team use? ie. agile, scrum, etc. This depends on the phase of the project which we're in - during "normal" development (like now!) we use a customized scrum-based project. When we're finalling we tend to go back to a traditional team-based just-fix-the-bugs process.
What do you use for source control and how do you handle refactoring code for optimization? Or do you try for best optimization on the first pass? We use perforce for source control. We have a few branches which we can work in to do refactoring (for optimization or any reason) so we can roll things out when they're ready.
What standards and practices do you use? Game development is actually pretty normal software development - we use technical design documents, coding standards, code reviews, etc, etc.
How does someone that is a new graduate get into the game programming job market when most jobs require being part of a published title already? Write games in your spare time! They don't have to be massive, just small polished games. People who are passionate about game development can't help themselves - they write games no matter what. That's how I got into the industry - I wrote a Game Boy emulator.
What is your engine written in? It's mostly in C++
How often to you dive down to the bit level of data manipulation? Very often :-)
Ever have to write Assembly code? Sometimes, although these days it's fairly rare.
Are you guys looking to eventually move to git/mercurial, since Perforce appears to now have Git integration? When you "scrum" what tools do you use to help with the process (ex. Pivotal)? Are you tasking with hours, story points, sprints, stories, epics, business value, etc.? As a company, no we won't be moving away from perforce. Git doesn't handle large, binary assets well and that's a problem for us. However, I personally use Git constantly on top of Perforce on my local machine for code. I find having a personal source control solution to manage my many different concurrent tasks and projects an indispensable part of my work process.
Any especially salient reason for settling on C++? Mostly performance.
Is your emulator widely used? Or just your personal one. I never released it, sadly - it was really a personal project to see whether I could do it. There were much better ones out at the time :-)
Can you explain a little more about your personal source control setup? This is really intriguing to me. Briefly as I need to get back to work =P. I use a git repository that ignores everything except code (so things like *.cpp, *.h, .vcproj, etc. make it in). My master branch is always clean and is what I am in when I sync perforce. Then I have branches for everything I'm working on and just rebase them onto master as I update master. When I'm satisfied with my work, I have a powershell script that takes the differences between my current branch and master, and creates a new perforce changelist with these files in it. I then merge the branch into master then submit the generated changelist (after writing the appropriate description of course =P).
I also have a backup repository on another computer that I constantly push to so if I ever have to change machines, experience hard drive corruption or some other catastrophic failure, I still have all my work.
I'm assuming you took some design steps early on to port it to other platforms easily too, which makes C++ a great choice? That's a great point - C++ is pretty portable, which is important for us.
What do you mean when you say 'mostly C++'? Is it written in other languages as well? How would that even work? We have a lot of different systems - the game client is only one of them (lots of different servers and tools and other backend services). We use a variety of languages depending on the needs of the system.
Thank you for answering! This was one of those glass shattering as you realize your life could be so much easier moments for me. Glad I could help! It took me a weekend of time to get it set up in a useful way. Then that Monday, first time I started using it, I wondered how I ever survived without it!
your colleagues aren't complaining about missing commits because you commit entire branches as one patch? (unless I misunderstood this) The git repository is strictly to assist me in keeping track of my work. I'm not commiting HUGE changes to perforce all at once, I'm still checking in changelists that are the same size as if I hadn't used git. However my git checkins are usually tiny bite-size checkins that you would never check in to a shared repository. The net result is that each branch turns into a log of my work. This of course helps me tremendously when going back and debugging, seeing where I went wrong, how I iterated on a problem, going back to a previous technique as I learn more about what I'm working on, etc.
My old colleagues would. :D. The other major advantage that git provides for me is the ability to quickly be in a clean state. I shut down whatever I'm working in, a quick "git checkout master" later and I'm at a clean state that I can branch from and fix a high-pri bug that just popped up and "ZOMG MUST BE FIXED NAO!" without losing any work or letting what I'm working on interfere with the bug. It also is nice when someone checks in something that breaks the build (which of course NEVER happens =P). I unwittingly sync up (I always sync p4 when I have git's master branch checked out and check the fresh sync into git with the latest p4 changelist number in the git commit description), then "git rebase master" the branch I'm working on. Well, instead of syncing, building, just to find out I'm blocked, I can simply "git rebase master~1" and all of a sudden my branch is RIGHT back where it was before I synced and I can continue working as the appropriate party is fixing the blocking issue! (Side effect, this has also helped track down issues in the past as I now have a record of two builds between which the build broke.)
Why not just use Perforce shelving? I started using a local git repo around the time that Perforce introduced shelving. The impetus was the fact that shelving appeared to be incredibly useful to me but at the time, p4 didn't allow you to merge changes from a shelve into local changes. This was a huge problem for me as I was always touching a file I had shelved and then dealing with getting everything synced up again after unshelving was kind of a pain. The local solution I started rolling at that point was far more flexible and powerful. I'm also a command-line kind of guy so it all just fit for me. Since then p4 has most definitely improved shelving a LOT and also introduced streams. Both of these features can (I believe) accomplish everything I do with git but I'm used to git and I don't see a need to change currently. The only advantage I see is the reliability of our p4 depot and storing my work there. But I'm used to backing up my git repository constantly so it just doesn't seem worth it to me to switch.
Will you ever implement or even consider a FoV slider? We've heard players loud and clear on this one. But we're not prepared to answer yet because we just convened a team to investigate, on Monday in fact, and we want to give them time to investigate. For example, there may be a bug affecting FoV calculations in widescreen resolutions. We want to know what's a bug and what's by design before we change the design.
What kind of witchcraft you use that makes both Guild Wars and Guild Wars 2 not need hours and hours of downtime for server maintenance and game updates? Ok, so this is kinda secret, but I'll tell you anyway. I can tell you because it's easy to say and really hard to do.
We have a system which lets us run the old build and the new build at the same time. So we don't need to take the old build down when there's a new one, we just also host the new build.
That's it, it's that simple in concept. But complicated to implement.
It also requires great care because our back-end servers must support the old and new build at the same time. Sometimes (not too often) we have to write code that only runs while both builds are live just to keep things compatible; then we remove it. As Cam hinted, it's something you have to architect in from the very beginning.
Do people on the "old build" still interact with people on the "new build" ? or are they segregated until they get on the same build? They are segregated, except for some things like party and guild chat.
Whoever keeps that piece of code-fu working deserves a cookie. It's ok, they get a lot of cupcakes :-)
Aww man. I figured you did something like this. One of my favorite features in the entire game is not immediately getting kicked from story mode when there's a new build. I was so goddamn thrilled the first time it told me "you have 3 hours" rather than "you have three minutes." Yeah, it gives you a different amount of time depending on what you're doing. We try to minimize disruption as much as possible.
As you say, it would be pretty annoying to be 80% of the way through a dungeon and then get kicked to the new build!
Is there a point to reporting bots any more? Not "hey you aren't doing anything about them," but more along the lines of the activities I recognize as botting (identical pathing, attacking thin air, identical (default) appearance, and so forth) seems like it should be able to be recognized via an automated system. If I see twelve bots running an identical path killing ALL the things, and only report ten of those (hard to remember if I've already reported xzxcczccx as well as vbcvvbcxxxvb), do those other two get to keep on going? Or can I report only a handful to have them all looked at? Is bug reporting in game more effective than on the forum? Or the reverse? Or are they about the same? For issues like the broken skill point in Metrica Province (with the dead Hylek NPC), is it really much more complicated than "if dead, resurrect"? Surface level it seems so trivial to correct, wondering if there's more to it that players aren't seeing. We've seen some information on the breakdown of the number of players choosing races. Will we be seeing more of that type of information? (side question -- closing in on two months after release, did any of the player demographics surprise the team?) We ban bots in waves. Those two aren't getting a pass. There are several advantages of using the forums for both developers and players - we can ask for additional specific information, and also we can respond to threads on the forums. Both bug reporting and the forums are very useful for us. Personally, I wish we'd been better prepared with the Trading Post, and that we'd been better prepared with content problems with things like events and skill points.
Is the culling issue in WvW (making other players invisible for sake of serveclient issues) going to get better? Do you like the state that it is currently in? Actually we have plans to improve this a lot. The biggest problem is making sure that we don't send too much data down to the client and make people on slower connections lag out. But we think this is solvable, we're on it.
Cam.
The issues with invisible players in WvW comes down to a couple of factors. One is to do with when the servers notify any given client about other characters in the game (I'll call this reporting/culling) and the other deals with the time it takes the client to present the character on the screen after it has received that notification (I'll call this asset load).
The asset load issue is all about how quickly the client can show you something it knows it should show you. We're looking in to ways that we can make that process faster, but it's always going to take non-zero time. However, that's not where the bulk of the invisible players come from. For that we have to look at the reporting/culling side of things.
In the situation where the local population density is relatively low, when another character comes in reporting range of your character the server sends a notification to your client with all of the data that it will need to track and render that character. That includes appearance data, race, gender, profession, weapon sets, etc. etc. It's an easy model to think about and works well, until the local population density goes up. When there are a lot of characters in reporting range we start to get into a situation where, under the current system, there's an overwhelming amount of data to send to the client (hello n-squared problem!) - after all, resources like client CPU/Memory/etc. and bandwidth are finite. In order to deal with this situation we elected to change the criteria for reporting characters slightly. Rather than just using a fixed range we instead also limit reporting to the closest N characters. By doing this we help to ensure that we're not overwhelming the available bandwidth and, since clients clearly can't draw or process characters they don't know about, we get some savings on client performance "for free". This works out pretty well in PvE and doesn't seem, at least as far as I can tell, to have a detrimental impact on gameplay.
Unfortunately in WvW, where large battles are quite common, we find that players are bumping into these limits quite often and the effect has a real, and unfortunate, impact on the gameplay experience. Do I like the state that it's currently in? No, honestly I don't. WvW has been my baby (though not mine alone!) for quite a while now and I really want to see EPIC battles play out in all of their glory. If there was a switch I could flip to just make this work then I would have flipped the hell out of it by now, believe me. However, when you're dealing with resource utilization issues like this there are rarely any easy answers. I'm currently, actively looking into what exactly our options are in this regard. The fix is likely to be large-ish in scope, with changes on both the client and server, but we have some ideas that look like they may work out. So, will it get better? I can't make any promises because we're still experimenting and building new tech, but as a person who works on this every day I certainly believe that it can and will do everything in my power to make that happen.
Also, more skins for weapons that are NOT GREATSWORDS. Show more love to the other weapons. Apologies in advance for only hitting one of your questions, but I'm not certain of the answers to the rest of them, so ;-)
Any plan to implement multiple trait set? That would be cool. I'd use that! We have a lot of things on the "cool to do" list though - we're working through it!
Also, what is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow? Branded or unbranded?
What are some other things on the "Cool to do" list? Well, I'll give you a historical example. The very top of the Cool To Do list when we shipped (for me, anyway) was crafting directly from collections... done!
It's that type of thing. Sorry I can't supply anything specific, sometimes this stuff looks easy and turns out to be hard to do the right way - so I don't want to commit to anything we might end up not shipping for some reason.
sometimes this stuff looks easy and turns out to be hard to do the right way. This is the sign of a battlescarred developer, and a wise one at that. My friend, don't even get me started :-)
Tabs or spaces? 4 spaces. No tabs.
Braces on the same line as the function signature, or on the next line? :o. Same line void Foo () { ... }
sigh Way to kill my dream of working at ANet. It's important to note here that HAVING a coding standard in your studio is more important than exactly what the standard is. Being able to move into anyone else's code in the studio and not be distracted by style differences is huge.
I am currently studying as a software engineer. Any large game or software is amazing, but how do you scale it up to handle so many things happening at once and synchronize this among all players? I can imagine how you might handle player movements, but once you start having 50 players, each moving and using skills multiple times per second, all while there are other mobs... I start to lose sight how this is even possible (without using way too much bandwidth). tl;dr Could you shed light on how you scale these server transactions up to handle so many players and environment objects at once? Of course messages are trimmed down as much as possible, but the best way to save bandwidth is to not send messages in the first place. At any given time, there are a lot of characters not using skills and not changing their movement and not even visible to you. We report to you precisely what you need for your view of the world where you are standing.
What particular role do programmers play in the pre-production or design phase of game development, if any? This varies a lot by studio. In some places, preprod and design are almost entirely separate from implementation. Those are the less fortunate shops, IMHO. In more pleasant studios like ArenaNet, we do what we can to involve all disciplines in the entire production process. This means that programmers typically have input into what is technically feasible and interesting from day one of design and preproduction.
How is the coding workload typically divided up among a team of programmers, if at all, at Anet? At the moment, we're organized by major groups of features. For instance, my team is focused on security in the game; anything pertaining to that generally lands on our plate. Different individuals always have their own strengths and specialties as well, so they tend to get assigned things that (A) they will enjoy working on and (B) they'll do a great job with.
About how much time, on average, would you estimate one spends on code per day during the production phase? This is really tough. How do you define time spent on code? Does that include reading code to find a bug? Does that include time spent talking about code with other developers? Does that include planning meetings that ultimately result in creating code?
What duties do game programmers have beyond simply writing game code? Troubleshooting problems is probably the second biggest thing we do, especially post-ship. We also spend a lot of time assisting in the design of new features, as I outlined earlier, to help ensure that everything we tackle is technically solid.
Programmers are super important during the design phase - it's really easy for designers to come up with cool ideas which could never be implemented. And (surprisingly commonly) designers sometimes self-limit their ideas because they think they'd be too hard to do - when actually there's an easy way of doing them. It's a collaboration.
We have lots of programmers and lots of work to do - we use a task tracking system to keep track of it all. In general our feature teams break down their high level goals into tasks and it'll be picked up by one of the programmers on that feature team.
During production, I'd say that a normal programmer would spend about 6 hours a day writing code.
Programmers tend to do activities related to writing code - brainstorming design ideas with other programmers, writing up technical proposals, buddy checking other programmer's commits, and so on.
During pre-production programmers may be working on general engine-level features or supporting prototyping efforts of design ideas.
Workload is usually divided up per-feature. For example, I'm mainly responsible for animation-related code in the game client. However, while we do emphasize code-ownership, we also value flexibility and shared knowledge of the code base, which allows us to shift the focus of programmers as different problems arise.
This is a tricky question, as it really depends on whats being worked on. If you've got a large feature or problem already worked out in your head or on paper, you may spend the majority of the day writing the code. However you may instead be working on a tricky bug, which means you'll be spending a good amount of time reproducing the problem, reading debug info, hypothesizing, testing fixes etc. So... anywhere from 0-8 hours, assuming you're not working overtime.
Fixing bugs and coordinating with designers, artists, and/or QA teams.
Obviously aim high in whatever you do, but for someone like me who has little to no side projects that amount to anything would you suggest that I continue to work on these to set myself apart from everyone else getting into the industry or should I throw my resume out to everyone I can? I wanted to apply for the internship you guys offered but I don’t feel confident with my current skill set which happens to be the reason why I’m doing side projects. Guild Wars 2 started development in 2007-08 I believe? Over the years I imagine new technologies that were discovered may have outperformed old technologies. What would you suggest that others start to learn today that you would have like to have known in ’07 –’08. I don’t know how well the programming team delved into the design portion of the game but I imagined everyone had a “Wouldn’t it be cool if…” What was the best “Wouldn’t it be cool if…” that never made it into the release? Finally I would like to thank you guys for working on such a wonderful game. It has truly blown my expectation out of the water. P.s. What’s with all the trench coat armor for medium armor? (1) Technologies change all the time; in terms of advising somebody what to learn now ... to be successful as a programmer you'll want to be able to adapt to the the fact that technology does change so often. Experimenting with new technology is a great way to broaden your horizons as a programmer (especially if that means learning a functional language when all you've previously known are other paradigms, for example) as well as a good way to teach you how to learn new things. You totally just need to keep plugging away at your own stuff. Having things to show off is the best way to impress in an interview, and the experience you gain from doing a "real world" project (as opposed to some sort of contrived demo) can be invaluable. Certainly technology always changes. It would have been nice if things like Direct3D 11 were available and ubiquitous back in 2007, but unfortunately hardware takes time and iteration to develop. No problem. We love to play games as much you guys, so being able to make one with our own ideas is an amazing experience. Whenever anybody asks me about getting into the industry (as a programmer) my first response has to be: Write code! Write code! Write code! Also, make games!!! There is no substitute for either writing code or making games and the more you do it the better you'll get at it. So I'd say you should do both: work on side projects as much as possible and send your resume to every company that you'd like to work for. New technology is awesome but it's not the most important thing. The most important thing is fundamentals. The deeper your fundamental understanding and the stronger your critical thinking skills the easier it will be to learn (or invent) new technology on job, and you'll be doing that often. One of the best things about working at ArenaNet is that we're all there to make the best games we can. We tend to work on small, cross-discipline feature teams that provide a lot of opportunity to share ideas. There are a bunch of ideas that didn't make it in, to be sure, but we keep all those around for later and I wouldn't want to spoil anything.
To the content pipeline programmers, what is the craziest request you had where the only proper response was "just no"? What was your favorite thing to program? Often designers want us to validate content data in such a way that would require us to solve the halting problem. As you can imagine, our game content is incredibly complicated, and there are a lot of things that are computationally expensive to verify, especially every time you want to make a change.
I built a lot of the tools we used to do very large scale load testing in preparation for launch, which used Amazon EC2 instances to log nearly a hundred thousand game clients into the game in just a few minutes. It actually literally used hardware spun up all around the world, on (edit: actually FOUR) different continents. Pushing the button to start those tests was always pretty awesome.
Please tell me that button was both big and red. It's just the enter key, I'm afraid - it's a little console app that talks to all the aws datacenters around the world and tells them all to begin spinning up instances. You just type a number in the console of how many you need, and press enter, and it does everything else. It's much more exciting than that sounds.
Now that the Mac client is available, any chance of a linux client? We have no official plans to launch a linux client. Having said that, I personally use linux a lot (starting with Slackware on those sweet A/D/etc floppy disks) and would love a native client. It's also really healthy for your code to support different platforms and compilers.
And as stuzart mentions, GW2 does actually run pretty well in Wine.
Now that you mention it, it would be awesome to know that someone - maybe you - checked from time to time if updates break wine. I understand that wine compatibility can't be a show-stopper, but some of your fans really depend on it :) We do actually check this - in fact, we've made a couple of changes specifically for Wine compatibility.
How did you learn to code? Do you have any tips for a "youngling"? 1.I've been writing code my whole life. At first I was self-taught and wrote terrible self-taught code. Then I did a Computer Systems Engineering degree and learnt how to do it properly. But in general you get good at coding by writing code. 5.Write games! Seriously, just write lots of code and put something together in your spare time. Or anything technically challenging - I wrote a Game Boy emulator, that's how I got into the industry. 2 - As Cam said, most of our code base is in C++ and I do enjoy that. However my favorite language is probably the one I haven't learned yet =). I'm always trying to learn a new language because I find that just about all of them are valid in some context to solve some set of problems. I see programming languages as tools in my toolbox and picking the right one for the job is very important. Make games. Or at least find out if you enjoy making games, as it's not for everyone. If you do end up teaching yourself programming, keep short and simple goals, and just slowly build up, as there are so many things to learn that go into game development. Write code! Make games! Don't be a game programmer because you kinda want to, be a game programmer because you can't do anything else, because even if nobody paid you to do it you'll still write games anyway.
What programming language is your favorite and why? Do you prefer working on a small game or a big game? Why? 2.We mostly use C++ - so I guess that's officially my favorite language for writing a game like GW2. But from a pure language perspective, C# is probably my current favorite. I used to use Delphi (ObjectPascal) a lot, so that's probably why. 1 - I started out doing electronics stuff in high school and as a result, learned very low level things (even down to machine language programming at one point). I eventually got higher and higher level and enjoyed programming so much that in college I changed majors to programming. I love me some C++, but I'm a language geek (both computer and human) so it's hard for me to pick a favorite. I generally think that there's a right tool for every job and since languages are just another tool it really depends on what problem I'm trying to solve.
4.When I started in the industry I worked on a bunch of smaller "boutique" titles, so I feel like I've done that, and now I love the challenge of big games. 4 - Both have their advantages and my desires shift with the times. Small games are awesome as I really get the sense of directly affecting the final outcome. However the feeling of being a part of a large project completing successfully is unmatched. 5 - As Cam said, write games =). I would also like to recommend working on your math skills and problem solving skills. I find that most of my job is solving some problem given some set of constraints and nothing teaches you that skill set (IMHO) like higher math. Not to mention that math is of course incredibly useful in its own right as a programmer =P. I've done both, from a small Nintendo DS game, to this huge MMO... and I'm undecided. There are things I like and dislike about both. Amazing, challenging, terrifying, fun, stressful, and immensely rewarding. Working on games is a dream come true for me, and Gw2 is the kind of project that doesn't come along every day. I've had a blast. Small games are great because you get to finish things so (relatively) often, but working on a big game like Gw2 is like nothing else. I cut my teeth on classic cyberpunk novels (William Gibson, etc.) and I'm still enchanted by the idea of a fully realized metaverse. I love that working on a massive online world like Gw2 feels like, in some small way, I'm helping to move us toward that goal.
Can you list all the programming languages used to develop the GW2 client? Is it 100% C++ or do you also incorporate scripting languages like Python or Ruby? The game is written in C++. We do use other languages for other aspects of development (our tools framework is in C# and is uses Python for scripting). Many of us engineers will also write scripts for our own personal use, to automate some daily tasks we may do frequently (I use a lot of Powershell and Ruby).
Is Powershell any good? When I'm on windows I always feel hobbled by the non-unix shell. Even bash via MinGW/Cygwin is annoying. It has some quirks, but now that I'm familiar with it I prefer it greatly over bash and zsh, which are the other two shells I most frequently use.
Can we please get a WvW queue number? This would REALLY help, especially since it's gotten long on my server since we started winning more. Probably part of why we're winning more. Edit: (sorry, steam of consiousness) How some form of way to get to the front of the line, with limited use? Say, allow a guild to skip to the front of the queue one night a week. Players can only use during one period of time so as to avoid multi-guild abuse. I've only spent about 15 seconds so haven't thought it through, and this is more of a design thing, but this would allow casuals to better-plan a WvW night with their guild. Technically feasible, though? I understand guesting would have to be done carefully so as not to mess up balance in a tight WvW match, but could also be great. Maybe only allow players to guest to "undermanned" servers or those who are behind on total or current points. Could help create more balanced matches, and maybe you could even put a small price on it, for either the joining players (pay to have no queue!) or the ones being joined (undermanned? hire mercenaries!). Hmmm this is probably secret, but we're all friends here! We have something in development which will greatly increase the number of people who can play WvW at the same time.
I was wondering how events are scripted, do the people who create events have to script it all by hand, or do you use some sort of WYSIWYG tool that writes the scripts for them? Events and other content in our game are created with a proprietary in-house tool called Duo, which uses a custom scripting language (it's more-or-less a visual tool, but reads like text and not a graph of "nodes").
if so: What kind of language do you use? and how much flexibility does it provide? During the development of the tool we worked very closely with the designers who would be using it on a day-to-day basis to make sure that it they'd be able to use it efficiently and effectively for all the content they need to build.
Last updated: 2012-10-24 11:24 UTC
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